8/27/18 O&A NYC HOLLYWOOD MONDAY: Gregory and Maurice Hines- Crazy Rhythm! (The Cotton Club Movie)

Gregory and Maurice Hines, true-life brothers played tap and brothers and rivals Delbert “Sandman” Williams (Gregory) and Clayton “Clay” Williams (Maurice) in The Cotton Club (1984). Continue reading

5/27/16 O&A NYC SHALL WE DANCE FRIDAY: Gregory and Maurice Hines

Shall We Dance
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Gregory and Maurice Hines, Harlem natives and child entertainers  were the sons of Alma Iola (Lawless) and Maurice Robert Hines, a dancer, musician, and actor. Maurice began his career at the age of five and Gregory at age two. Both studied tap dance at the Henry LeTang Dance Studio in Manhattan. LeTang recognized their talent and began choreographing numbers specifically for them patterned on the Nicholas Brothers. Continue reading

2/19/16 O&A NYC THEATRE: Maurice Hines- Tappin Thru Life

By Walter Rutledge

Shall We Dancetappin_thru_life_a_lMaurice Hines presents Tappin Thru Life, at the New World Stages (340 West 50th Street), an entertaining mix of song, and dance peppered with Hines winning blend of tongue in cheek comedic realism. The evening chronicled his career in show business, which spans over six decades (beginning at age five). Septuagenarian (plus two) Hines charmed and cajoled the audience with unabashed panache, creating a clap along good time from beginning to end. Through a series of autobiographical anecdotes accompanied by song, dance and a mosaic/collage of multiple projected images Hines reveals a life spent “walkin the walk” or in Hines case “tappin thru life”.

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Apollo Club Harlem

By Walter Rutledge

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Apollo Club Harlem returned to the Apollo Theater for four performances Thursday, February 20 through Sunday, February 23, 2014. The evening consisted of a pre-show musical interlude by pianist Isaac Ben Ayala, a lively revue and post show dancing on stage for orchestra patrons. The stylish evening was a true up-scale date night combining entertainment, dining and dancing while celebrating the history of Harlem’s most venerable performance venue. Continue reading