5/27/16 O&A NYC SHALL WE DANCE FRIDAY: Gregory and Maurice Hines

Shall We Dance
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Gregory and Maurice Hines, Harlem natives and child entertainers  were the sons of Alma Iola (Lawless) and Maurice Robert Hines, a dancer, musician, and actor. Maurice began his career at the age of five and Gregory at age two. Both studied tap dance at the Henry LeTang Dance Studio in Manhattan. LeTang recognized their talent and began choreographing numbers specifically for them patterned on the Nicholas Brothers. Continue reading

1/2/15 O&A Shall We Dance Friday: Storyboard P- An Urban Storyteller

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Storyboard P has pushed street dancing in a darker, more mature direction of urban storytelling he calls Mutant. The twenty-three year old Brooklyn dancer  combines jarring feats of contortion, pantomime, floating footwork and simulated levitation. His choreography, most of it improvised, has a wide range of influences: Jerome Robbins, especially his work in West Side Story; the Nicholas Brothers, whose acrobatic tap-dancing routines amazed Fred Astaire in the nineteen-forties; and, above all, Michael Jackson.  Continue reading

Apollo Gala: Honors The Place Where Stars Are Born And Legends Are Made

By Walter Rutledge

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The annual Apollo Gala has become one of the premiere uptown events. The star studded casts and celebrity laden audience recalls the glamor of the original Harlem Renaissance. This year the format was slightly different; instead of paying homage to a music legend, we were invited to honor the legendary Apollo Theater on the concert hall’s 80th anniversary. Continue reading

Shall We Dance Friday: The Nicholas Brothers in “Jumpin Jive” from Stormy Weather

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The Nicholas Brothers were a famous African- American team of dancing brothers, Fayard (1914–2006) and Harold (1921–2000). With their highly acrobatic technique (flash dance), high level of artistry and daring innovations, they were considered by many the greatest tap dancers of their day. Continue reading