5/13/19 O&A NYC WHATS HAPPENING THIS WEEK: May 13- 20, 2019

Its mid- May great walking weather. The dark heavy jackets have been replaced by light sweaters and floral prints as New Yorkers stroll down bustling streets in the world’s cultural Mecca. Art and dance are everywhere from Midtown to Brooklyn; we have Latin jazz in Harlem and Shakespeare and the Temptations are both on Broadway. Here are a few of the many events happening in the city that never sleeps, guaranteed to keep you Out and About. Continue reading

5/11/19 O&A NYC DANCE/REVIEW: The Dallas Black Dance Theater In The Spirit Of Now

By Walter Rutledge

The Dallas Black Dance Theater (DBDT) presented their all too short New York season, “Spirit Of Now” at the Ailey Citigroup Theater on Thursday, May 2 and Friday, May 3. The two-day two performance series marked the sixth season at the venue and the first season for the recently appointed Artistic Director Melissa M. Young. Her twenty-five-year association with DBDT (eleven years as a performing and fourteen administrative/artistic) gives Young a unique understanding of the company ethos. A teary eyed Young promised the audience the company would, “Move your spirit”.  Continue reading

5/3/19 O&A NYC WHATS HAPPENING THIS WEEKEND: Friday May 3 Through Monday May 6

The weekend is finally here and New York is gearing up rain or shine. We have music and fashion in Harlem, dance from Lincoln Center to Williamsburg; while the Avengers take it to the limit one more time. Here are a few of the many events happening in the city that never sleeps, guaranteed to keep you Out and About.

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4/21/19 O&A NYC WHATS HAPPENING THIS WEEK: April 22 Through April 29, 2019

Happy Easter and Passover New Yorkers will be out and about in their Easter bonnets!  This week we have dance at Lincoln Center and R&B legends are at the legendary Apollo. Orchids are in bloom in The Bronx and a Creole Food Festival in lower Manhattan. Here are a few of the many events happening in the city that never sleeps, guaranteed to keep you Out and About.

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4/21/19 O&A NYC GOSPEL SUNDAY: Revelations- Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater

Alvin Ailey’s Revelations uses African-American spirituals, song-sermons, gospel songs and holy blues, Alvin Ailey’s Revelations fervently explores the places of deepest grief and holiest joy in the soul. More than just a popular dance work, it has become a cultural treasure, beloved by generations of fans. Continue reading

4/12/19 O&A NYC DANCE: Annie Heath- NewSteps (Spring 2019)

Spring 2019 newsteps: a choreographers Series  began its Spring 2019 showcase on Thursday April 11. The performances continues tonight and Saturday 13, 7:30pm at the Chen Dance Center, 70 Mulberry St, 2nd floor in New York City’s historic Chinatown district. Five choreographers Annie Heath, Mat Elder, Erin Bryce Holmes, Tanner Ryan and Spencer Weidie will premiere original works and works in progress. Let’s meet NewSteps choreographer Erin Bryce Holmes.  Continue reading

3/7/19 O&A NYC DANCE: Meet Erin Bryce Holmes- NewSteps (Spring 2019)

Spring 2019 newsteps: a choreographers Series will present its Spring 2019 showcase Thursday April 11 through Saturday 13, 7:30pm at the Chen Dance Center, 70 Mulberry St, 2nd floor in New York City’s historic Chinatown district. Five choreographers Annie Heath, Mat Elder, Erin Bryce Holmes, Tanner Ryan and Spencer Weidie will premiere original works and works in progress. Let’s meet NewSteps choreographer Erin Bryce Holmes.  Continue reading

4/7/19 O&A NYC WHAT’S HAPPENING THIS WEEK: April 7 through April 14, 2019

Its beginning to feel a lot like springtime, and New Yorkers are out and about!  And this week we have a new film about the Queen of Soul and a Fosse muse on Broadway. America’s mother of modern dance turns 93 in Chelsea and Arthur Mitchell’s dream turns 50. Here are a few of the many events happening in the city that never sleeps, guaranteed to keep you Out and About. Continue reading

4/7/19 O&A NYC DANCE/REVIEW: Venezuela- Batsheva Dance Company

By Walter Rutledge

The Batsheva Dance Company presented the New York premiere of Venezuela by house choreographer Ohad Naharin on March 27 through March 30 at the Brooklyn Academy of Music Howard Gillman Opera House. The program notes described the work as, “exploring the dialogue and conflict between movement and the content it represents”. As the work began the most compelling observation became that Venezuela is an experiment in perception.

The curtain rose without the usual dramatic fanfare of dimming the lights to darkness. This action caught the audience off guard silencing them with a heightened sense of curiosity. Eight dancers were standing downstage center and began a slow migration to center stage as the house lights slowly dimmed. The soft and soothing music for the entire first act of Maxim Waratt soundtrack consisted of a series Gregorian chants; and the combination of music and the upstage movement progression created an aura of mystery.

Naharin immediately establishes the work’s most notable elements; that of slow, sustained and repetitive movement phrases. Employing these choreographic devises allows the audience to absorb the movement and intent, and to remember and eventually recall the stunning visual imagery. A factor that will become important for interpreting the second act of Venezuela.

The upstage progression is interrupted by a solo female dancer extending an arm. The gesture,  with an upwardly extended arm, flexed wrist and stylized fingers, conjured Latin social dancing. A male dance extends his arm in a lower second position as if in response to the initial gesture. Soon all the dancers are engaged in a Naharin style Latin ballroom dance. The choreography seemed to work in an odd sort of tandem with the music, but it clearly established a dynamic counterpoint.

Good choreography goes beyond the steps and music, it establishes its own timing to create a visual music. Throughout the first act Naharin capitalized on this fact delivering cohesive sections of both visual and audio contrast. This was most evident in the section where the dancers rapped the lyrics from Dead Wrong, a rap song by Biggie Smalls aka the Notorious B.I.G. featuring additional rap lyrics from Eminem. Set against the Gregorian chant the effect was almost as shocking as finding a lifted toilet bowl seat in a nunnery.

As the lights rose again on the second act the dancers again moved to center stage restarting the work from the beginning.  The chant had been replaced by an eclectic score that kept the “Latin section” exciting- just more traditional. The same happened with the Biggie Small section with the rap set back to the original Al Green baseline sample; just as edgy but more contextually conventional.

Naharin masterfully variated and developed themes with nuanced discipline; which allowed changes in the environment (music, lighting, props and cast) to alter the visual perception of the choreography. In one such moment the dancers entered with rectangular shaped fabric. In the first section oatmeal colored rectangles slapped the floor as a solo dancer, crawled prostrate on the floor, seemingly tried to avoid the blows. The imagery creating a sense of penance. In the second rendition the rectangles were painted to represent national flags including the Palestinian, Brazilian and the Black Power (USA) flag. This time the “fabric flogging” took on social and politic overtones.

In another section five men walked on all fours with a woman straddling their backs. The long-sustained section created a mood of female dominance. In contrast, the imagery in the second act rendering set to Middle eastern inspired music transformed the section into a caravan.

The use of repetitive and sustained movement allowed the audience to retain the shapes and phrases. This made the second rendition an experiment in visual perception, instead of just a movement addendum. The strong musicality, which was so independent and prominent in the first act, was perfectly married to the music the proceeding act; leading us to surmise that Naharin probably choreographed the second rendering first.   

A yell from company member  Bobby Jene Smith signals the end of both acts. Maybe it was a metaphor, not signaling the end but announcing a new beginning. Ohad Naharin’s Venezuela makes a powerful artistic statement allowing us to see his world from two points of view. Both valid and both compelling.

3/5/19 O&A NYC SHALL WE DANCE FRIDAY: Appalachian Spring- Martha Graham Dance Company

Shall We Dance Graham Letter to World 1

To celebrate the 93th Season of the Martha Graham Dance Company, April 2 through April 14 at the Joyce Theater, O&A NYC Magazine reposts Martha Graham’s Appalachian Spring.

Appalachian Spring premiered on October 30th, 1944, at the Library of Congress, Coolidge Auditorium in Washington DC, with Martha Graham dancing the lead role. Created during the darkest days of War World II Graham wanted to create inspiring art that came out of the American experience.  Graham spoke of the work, “To be great art… it must belong to the country in which it flourishes, not be a pale copy of some art form perfected by another culture and another people”. Continue reading